The E.R.K. Plans to Write

A place to discuss your own works. Whether they may be literary, visual art, or music pieces, this is the place to show off your stuff!
User avatar
ASmouseInTheHouse
Caramel Crunch
Posts: 130
Joined: August 2019
Location: Some little corner of the world
Contact:

Post

Monica Stone wrote:
Sun Oct 11, 2020 4:49 pm
Morrie doesn't think he is morally wrong, but I could see Suzu holding a different view (or easily changing her mind if she holds Morrie's view). She seems to have been persuaded by line of thinking at the end of "The Good in People." That was part of the reason she was involved with the events of "A Sacrificial Escape" (besides the fact she probably wanted to be mentally challenged and breaking into Whit's End would have definitely been challenging). When Emily grills her about the escape room, her response is, "You and Matthew were never in any real danger! We would never have let anything happen to you!" I bet she's echoing Morrie's words. Of the two of them, Suzu is probably the most likely to reform her opinions. Morrie himself was cautious about how he saw Suzu change (which was the catalyst for him testing the Christian kids). It's pretty telling of their characters tbh.
Yes, I agree. :clap:
Polehaus53 wrote:
Mon Oct 12, 2020 11:42 am
However, Morrie (and maybe Suzu, too) gets bored and start messing with things they're not supposed to. They start "gaming" things again. It is then when the three of them run into Emily and notice how unfriendly she is to them. They want to be friends with Emily again, and they try manipulating things to do this.
Okay, in light of Monica's paragraph about Morrie and Suzu and this piece of Polehaus' summary, maybe Suzu is more reluctant (as Carl said in his outline) to manipulate Emily. Maybe she plays along at first, but then bails out. I don't know. :anxious: Let me know if you guys agree or disagree about this.
Once we get the general stuff down, we can get into the specifics of what exactly they do to game Emily and Whit's End.
"Next up, Mark Morgan's message to all math maniacs in the middle school is meaningful if you mingle by the mezzanine for a momentous mix of methodological mayhem and a menagerie of multiplicative inversions. Ha ha ha! I bet I could say this backwards. Inversions multiplicative of menagerie a and mayhem methodological..."
User avatar
Monica Stone
Strawberry
Posts: 97
Joined: September 2020
Contact:

Post

Polehaus53 wrote:
Mon Oct 12, 2020 11:42 am
I'm thinking that it may be over the question of either Whit's punishment to them, or else because, as has been suggested, Morrie and Suzu are causing trouble with more of their games. Or it could be both! Here's an idea: Maybe in the beginning of the episode, Whit, Morrie, and Suzu have an argument/disagreement over whether or not they deserve the punishment. They do not come to a conclusion. This would add tension. Then, as the episode progresses, Morrie and Suzu can cause problems, adding on to the tension.
This circles back to the question, what does Whit consider an appropriate punishment? I myself have no idea how *I* would discipline and punish Morrie & Suzu if I were in Whit's shoes. When listening to "A Sacrificial Escape", in particular, I assumed Morrie's punishment would be JD, and that made his actions easier to digest knowing that he would be held legally responsible. But knowing that the writers will try to wiggle their way out of this, how would be the right way to punish them? Let me know because I have no idea. Being grounded? What? How do you deal with what they did? At the end of part 3, Whit says, "Now about those consequences..." and Morrie and Suzu groan. They groan in a joking way that suggests, "Yeah, we saw this coming, it's still kinda annoying, but I get it."
Polehaus53 wrote:
Mon Oct 12, 2020 11:42 am
Yes, this is something I've been wondering. Especially the legal issues. I don't know how the Odyssey team plans to deal with it. It's a very complicated situation. As far as us trying to figure it out, I would say we should just keep it simple: As ASmouseInTheHouse suggested, perhaps Whit is keeping them busy working at Whit's End (fixing everything they ruined in the basement with the escape room, maybe?) as punishment. I don't know how much further we want to go with it. I'm willing to discuss this issue further.

I like the idea of them working at Whit's End.

On the legal issue, I did a little research and Ohio laws (and probably most laws in the States) would condemn Morrie & Suzu for committing crimes. The writers may try to wiggle out the legal ramifications of their actions. Or, they may not. Who knows? Maybe next episode is mainly about them going through the legal system. Idk. But the Rydell kids committed grievances worthy of criminal charges. Under Ohio law (and I assume most if not all laws in the States), they are technically guilty of kidnapping, which is a first-degree felony. They are also guilty of breaking & entering in regards to Whit's End & the school. And threatening to kill someone (death threats) is a crime, right? Dang, Morrie & Suzu. Are we going to mention at all how they did or did not get out of the legal mess? Part 3 suggests that the legal issues might not be a problem, so I don't know if we necessarily need to. It would make sense if we did, though.

I think it would be realistic if Morrie & Suzu still kinda went by their gaming ways (but not to the same extreme as before), but I have a few concerns with how it would play out. First of all, if they are nothing but little terrors, it wouldn't make sense narratively or realistically that Whit would put up with that unconditionally. If punishments don't work and they continue to act against Whit's rules, what would be Whit's reason to keep them? There must be conflict, but we have to present ways to show that they are redeemable & worth Whit's current life investment.

Also, regarding the last scene of "The Rydell Revelations." Morrie says, "Look, our father sent us to Odyssey because he thought our being around the people here...and around you...would push in the right direction. Well, I definitely think I'm heading that way...at least a little." To which Suzu enthusiastically responds, "As do I!" I think they would at least try to behave themselves in the beginning (although Morrie may morally try to challenge Whit on his beliefs) and perhaps habitually slip into their scheming ways (again, probably not to the same caliber at the escape room or anything).
Polehaus53 wrote:
Mon Oct 12, 2020 11:42 am
I like it! Morrie and Suzu can be up to their old tricks at Whit's End. They most certainly aren't going to change right away, and Whit's End is the perfect place for them to cause trouble! That sounds interesting.
Again, we, as the writers of this script, cannot let the characters go too far. There is a delicate balance that must be maintained. What do you suggest they do as their little games?
Polehaus53 wrote:
Mon Oct 12, 2020 11:42 am
That sounds good. Throughout the episode, we can have Emily run into them all and be cold to them. This can result in Morrie and Suzu wanting to do something to make it up and become friends with Emily. The part where Whit finds out about them "gaming" things close to him and "gaming" things to become friends with Emily would be halfway through the episode, I suppose.The question is whether or not Morrie and Suzu will accept Whit's correction if they don't think they are doing anything wrong.
I think at this point, we need to define gaming in this context. Are they basically doing Emily's "Operation: Regain Trust" that she used in "Square One"? Are they being super manipulative to try to become friends? If we create a false dichotomy between those two options, I vote we stay closer to the former rather than the latter. Of course, I don't want the Emily/Morrie/Suzu part of the episode to be too close to "Square One", so I don't exactly want them playing as Emily did in that episode.

Polehaus, I'm going to take your general outline and go through it by sentence, so we can get more clarity, elaborating on points and also asking questions:
Polehaus53 wrote:
Mon Oct 12, 2020 11:42 am
As you can see, I'm suggesting that perhaps we can combine all of these things: Whit, Morrie, and Suzu get into a disagreement over their punishment, but they do not come to a conclusion, this adding a layer of tension.

I think Whit gets the final say in their punishment and Morrie pushes back. Morrie continues to morally push Whit, perhaps even going so far as to suggest Whit is a hypocrite because he punishes Morrie for doing things that Whit can do unquestionably. This creates an interesting dilemma for for Whit and he must not only examin Morrie's actions & positions, but his own, too. There is some back and forth between Whit & Morrie in the episode, not so much differently than their conversation at the end of the TRR, part 2. And meanwhile, Suzu kinda just caught between the two.
Polehaus53 wrote:
Mon Oct 12, 2020 11:42 am
As part of their punishment, Whit is keeping Morrie and Suzu busy by helping him with Whit's End.
I like this idea and I'm cross I didn't think of it before :lol:
Polehaus53 wrote:
Mon Oct 12, 2020 11:42 am
However, Morrie (and maybe Suzu, too) gets bored and start messing with things they're not supposed to. They start "gaming" things again.
Perhaps, perhaps. But I'm curious to see what your definition of "gaming" is. Is Morrie programming the cobble box again without Whit's consent? Is he setting up scenarios for others again? I say that whatever he does should probably be on at least a somewhat smaller scale than before.
Polehaus53 wrote:
Mon Oct 12, 2020 11:42 am
It is then when the three of them run into Emily and notice how unfriendly she is to them. They want to be friends with Emily again, and they try manipulating things to do this. Between gaming things at Whit's End and gaming things to get Emily to trust them, problems arise.
Emily is likely avoiding them as much as possible and it is only when she is forced to talk to them that her bubble to the surface and they realize how truly upset she is with them. I'm kinda getting lost at some of the terms being used, so I guess we need to also define "manipulating" if we want to understand the episode's plot and trajectory. But I assume they take shortcuts and it backfires and there the problems arise.
Polehaus53 wrote:
Mon Oct 12, 2020 11:42 am
Halfway though the episode, Whit finds out everything they've been doing. He gives them further punishment, but there is now an even more serious disagreement.
He at least gives them a simple talking-to depending on the gravity of their actions. As I mentioned before, I like the idea of Morrie pushing back on Whit and drawing paralells between his actions & Whit's and not understanding the differences between them. It may challenge Whit, which I personally like.
Polehaus53 wrote:
Mon Oct 12, 2020 11:42 am
Morrie and Suzu do not think they have done anything wrong. "It is all good, isn't it?" they complain.
Refer to above. I think Morrie will push back harder on Whit than would Suzu. This is going to sound harsh on Morrie, but I think Suzu has a better informed-conscience than him and is more likely to take the advice of Whit.
Polehaus53 wrote:
Mon Oct 12, 2020 11:42 am
The tension between them is now worse than before. Raymond Rydell calls them and there is a feeling that they will be sent back to Japan. Maybe something dramatic can happen (maybe as a result of one of the things they have gamed) so that at the end they decide to work everything out, resulting in the Rydell kids staying in Odyssey.
I don't think Raymond Rydell wants them back tbh. He make act similiarly to how he did in TRR (part 2) and say, "I quit, I'm a bad dad, I'm not taking them, bye." He isn't an overly sympathetic character (and Phil Lollar says that's purposeful lol). And yes, they'll stay in Odyssey. The show isn't dropping these fascinating characters and neither are we lol.
Polehaus53 wrote:
Mon Oct 12, 2020 11:42 am
Emily is also less cold towards them.
When writing, we need to provide a reason why she has changed her attitude, even if the change is small. I can't think of a reason that Emily would reform her opinion of them (even just a little) at the moment. Emily needs to work through some of her feelings and rethinking her actions if she acts hostile. But really, Morrie & Suzu have to give her a reason to get any bit closer to reconciliation. And if the episode's focus is how they are struggling to change their ways, I don't know if that'd work quite yet.

I have written so much, so please push back on any or all points of mine if you disagree.
User avatar
Polehaus53
Strawberry
Posts: 55
Joined: September 2020
Location: The Archives

Post

Oh boy. This is a lot, but I did ask for it. :D :lol:

I did not get specific when writing the outline. I based mostly everything on what you've stated in the E.R.K. and in our PMs.
Monica Stone wrote:
Mon Oct 12, 2020 10:34 pm
When listening to "A Sacrificial Escape", in particular, I assumed Morrie's punishment would be JD, and that made his actions easier to digest knowing that he would be held legally responsible. But knowing that the writers will try to wiggle their way out of this, how would be the right way to punish them? Let me know because I have no idea. Being grounded? What? How do you deal with what they did?
I also have no idea what their punishment would be. I didn't get specific because I couldn't think of anything specific. All I know is that as part of their punishment is Whit keeping them busy at Whit's End. Being grounded would not work, I think, because we need Morrie and Suzu need to have access to Whit's End and any other places we need them to be in order to advance the episode's plot. (Unless we have them do everything while under restriction.)
Monica Stone wrote:
Mon Oct 12, 2020 10:34 pm
the Rydell kids committed grievances worthy of criminal charges. Under Ohio law (and I assume most if not all laws in the States), they are technically guilty of kidnapping, which is a first-degree felony. They are also guilty of breaking & entering in regards to Whit's End & the school. And threatening to kill someone (death threats) is a crime, right? Dang, Morrie & Suzu. Are we going to mention at all how they did or did not get out of the legal mess? Part 3 suggests that the legal issues might not be a problem, so I don't know if we necessarily need to. It would make sense if we did, though.
I agree, Morrie and Suzu did break laws, and they need to face the law. But like you said, I think the Odyssey writers are going to wiggle their way out of it. And if we wanted to address the legal issues, I would have no idea how that would work and how we would write about it. We can maybe a brief mention of it, maybe, but I wouldn't know how to go about that. Therefore, as I suggested, I think we should just keep it simple and focus on what Whit does to punish them.
Monica Stone wrote:
Mon Oct 12, 2020 10:34 pm
I think it would be realistic if Morrie & Suzu still kinda went by their gaming ways (but not to the same extreme as before), but I have a few concerns with how it would play out. First of all, if they are nothing but little terrors, it wouldn't make sense narratively or realistically that Whit would put up with that unconditionally. If punishments don't work and they continue to act against Whit's rules, what would be Whit's reason to keep them? There must be conflict, but we have to present ways to show that they are redeemable & worth Whit's current life investment.

Also, regarding the last scene of "The Rydell Revelations." Morrie says, "Look, our father sent us to Odyssey because he thought our being around the people here...and around you...would push in the right direction. Well, I definitely think I'm heading that way...at least a little." To which Suzu enthusiastically responds, "As do I!" I think they would at least try to behave themselves in the beginning (although Morrie may morally try to challenge Whit on his beliefs) and perhaps habitually slip into their scheming ways (again, probably not to the same caliber at the escape room or anything).
Agreed on all points here. I didn't consider why Whit would keep them if they continued acting against his rules and how we can show they are redeemable. We can come back to this later, but I'm first going to respond to everything else.
Monica Stone wrote:
Mon Oct 12, 2020 10:34 pm
Polehaus53 wrote:
Mon Oct 12, 2020 11:42 am
That sounds good. Throughout the episode, we can have Emily run into them all and be cold to them. This can result in Morrie and Suzu wanting to do something to make it up and become friends with Emily. The part where Whit finds out about them "gaming" things close to him and "gaming" things to become friends with Emily would be halfway through the episode, I suppose.The question is whether or not Morrie and Suzu will accept Whit's correction if they don't think they are doing anything wrong.
I think at this point, we need to define gaming in this context. Are they basically doing Emily's "Operation: Regain Trust" that she used in "Square One"? Are they being super manipulative to try to become friends? If we create a false dichotomy between those two options, I vote we stay closer to the former rather than the latter. Of course, I don't want the Emily/Morrie/Suzu part of the episode to be too close to "Square One", so I don't exactly want them playing as Emily did in that episode.
I agree with you: I wasn't thinking about them repeating what Emily did in "Square One." I was thinking of them being super manipulative to try to become friends. That would work better, like you've said.
Monica Stone wrote:
Mon Oct 12, 2020 10:34 pm
Polehaus53 wrote:
Mon Oct 12, 2020 11:42 am
As you can see, I'm suggesting that perhaps we can combine all of these things: Whit, Morrie, and Suzu get into a disagreement over their punishment, but they do not come to a conclusion, this adding a layer of tension.

I think Whit gets the final say in their punishment and Morrie pushes back. Morrie continues to morally push Whit, perhaps even going so far as to suggest Whit is a hypocrite because he punishes Morrie for doing things that Whit can do unquestionably. This creates an interesting dilemma for for Whit and he must not only examin Morrie's actions & positions, but his own, too. There is some back and forth between Whit & Morrie in the episode, not so much differently than their conversation at the end of the TRR, part 2. And meanwhile, Suzu kinda just caught between the two.
This can be complicated. Is it really necessary to continue the discussion between Whit and Morrie? This would mean we'd have to come to a conclusion on how Whit's actions are different from Morrie's. And as I have said, I'm really tired of all the complex questions on whether Morrie was right. I don't have a problem with it being included in the episode, though, it just depends on what conclusion we come to. Or is it possible to include Morrie morally pushing Whit without getting too into it too deep? I agree Suzu would be caught between them.
Monica Stone wrote:
Mon Oct 12, 2020 10:34 pm
Polehaus53 wrote:
Mon Oct 12, 2020 11:42 am
However, Morrie (and maybe Suzu, too) gets bored and start messing with things they're not supposed to. They start "gaming" things again.
Perhaps, perhaps. But I'm curious to see what your definition of "gaming" is. Is Morrie programming the cobble box again without Whit's consent? Is he setting up scenarios for others again? I say that whatever he does should probably be on at least a somewhat smaller scale than before.
I was thinking of him setting up scenarios again. Not as drastic as before, of course.
Monica Stone wrote:
Mon Oct 12, 2020 10:34 pm
Polehaus53 wrote:
Mon Oct 12, 2020 11:42 am
It is then when the three of them run into Emily and notice how unfriendly she is to them. They want to be friends with Emily again, and they try manipulating things to do this. Between gaming things at Whit's End and gaming things to get Emily to trust them, problems arise.
Emily is likely avoiding them as much as possible and it is only when she is forced to talk to them that her bubble to the surface and they realize how truly upset she is with them. I'm kinda getting lost at some of the terms being used, so I guess we need to also define "manipulating" if we want to understand the episode's plot and trajectory. But I assume they take shortcuts and it backfires and there the problems arise.
By "manipulating" I was thinking that they set up situations to try to get Emily to trust them again. What do you mean by "shortcuts"?
Monica Stone wrote:
Mon Oct 12, 2020 10:34 pm
Polehaus53 wrote:
Mon Oct 12, 2020 11:42 am
Halfway though the episode, Whit finds out everything they've been doing. He gives them further punishment, but there is now an even more serious disagreement.
He at least gives them a simple talking-to depending on the gravity of their actions. As I mentioned before, I like the idea of Morrie pushing back on Whit and drawing paralells between his actions & Whit's and not understanding the differences between them. It may challenge Whit, which I personally like.
As I said, discussion between Morrie's and Whit's action leads back to us having to address the complex questions of if Morrie was right. And yes, of course, Whit gives them a talking-to when he finds out. :yes:
Monica Stone wrote:
Mon Oct 12, 2020 10:34 pm
Polehaus53 wrote:
Mon Oct 12, 2020 11:42 am
Morrie and Suzu do not think they have done anything wrong. "It is all good, isn't it?" they complain.
Refer to above. I think Morrie will push back harder on Whit than would Suzu. This is going to sound harsh on Morrie, but I think Suzu has a better informed-conscience than him and is more likely to take the advice of Whit.
Refer to above. But I do agree that Morrie would push back harder on Whit than Suzu. I didn't get specific on Suzu's take on all of this.
Monica Stone wrote:
Mon Oct 12, 2020 10:34 pm
Polehaus53 wrote:
Mon Oct 12, 2020 11:42 am
The tension between them is now worse than before. Raymond Rydell calls them and there is a feeling that they will be sent back to Japan. Maybe something dramatic can happen (maybe as a result of one of the things they have gamed) so that at the end they decide to work everything out, resulting in the Rydell kids staying in Odyssey.
I don't think Raymond Rydell wants them back tbh. He make act similiarly to how he did in TRR (part 2) and say, "I quit, I'm a bad dad, I'm not taking them, bye." He isn't an overly sympathetic character (and Phil Lollar says that's purposeful lol). And yes, they'll stay in Odyssey. The show isn't dropping these fascinating characters and neither are we lol.
Well, depending on how serious the problems are that Morrie and Suzu create, Raymond may decide it's better for them to be in Japan. As I stated in the theories I posted, the threat of them having to return to Japan will be part of it. They temporarily think they may need to "call the whole thing off".
I'd better clarify what I meant by 'something dramatic' happening. I was thinking that Morrie and Suzu messed with something they shouldn't (again, I didn't get specific) and it results in something serious/dangerous happening. That event brings them together and through it, Whit and the kids decide they should work their problems out.
Monica Stone wrote:
Mon Oct 12, 2020 10:34 pm
Polehaus53 wrote:
Mon Oct 12, 2020 11:42 am
Emily is also less cold towards them.
When writing, we need to provide a reason why she has changed her attitude, even if the change is small. I can't think of a reason that Emily would reform her opinion of them (even just a little) at the moment. Emily needs to work through some of her feelings and rethinking her actions if she acts hostile. But really, Morrie & Suzu have to give her a reason to get any bit closer to reconciliation. And if the episode's focus is how they are struggling to change their ways, I don't know if that'd work quite yet.
I can't think of anything either. This needs to be further discussed.

Thank you for your feedback, Monica Stone! :clap: I really appreciate it! :yes:

I do have a suggestion: I can respond a lot faster if we were to discuss one issue at a time, rather than writing and tackling all of them in a gigantic post. It also may be easier for everyone else to keep track of it all, too.
"our language contains many words having a double meaning; and...to pronounce a joke that allows both meanings of a certain word, proves the joker a person of culture and refinement, who has, moreover, a thorough command of the language."
User avatar
Monica Stone
Strawberry
Posts: 97
Joined: September 2020
Contact:

Post

Polehaus53 wrote:
Tue Oct 13, 2020 8:04 pm
I do have a suggestion: I can respond a lot faster if we were to discuss one issue at a time, rather than writing and tacking all of them in a gigantic post. It also may be easier for everyone else to keep track of it all, too.
Sure, that definitely would be easier haha. I just had too many thoughts if you couldn't tell. ;) I agree that we should work on issues one at a time until they are resolved. It'll get too messy if we try to deal with everything at once. I do want to respond to just a few points you brought up before we proceed forward.
Polehaus53 wrote:
Tue Oct 13, 2020 8:04 pm
Is it really necessary to continue the discussion between Whit and Morrie? This would mean we'd have to come to a conclusion on how Whit's actions are different from Morrie's.
I think it would be weird if we dropped that plot thread. I'm going to argue that Whit's actions are not much different than Morrie's in light of recent episodes. Whit may have a firmer foundation for why he does what he does, but that doesn't necessarily make what he does right. It doesn't have to be too heavy. Morrie can push back & Whit can provide answers to some of his questions. The questions that challenge Whit can be left open-ended and whatever conclusion Whit comes to can be vague and open for interpretation.
Polehaus53 wrote:
Mon Oct 12, 2020 11:42 am
By "manipulating" I was thinking that they set up situations to try to get Emily to trust them again. What do you mean by "shortcuts"?
Trust isn't an easy thing to regain, especially in Morrie & Suzu's case. As I'm sure all of us with agree, manipulation is an absolutely awful way to regain broken trust & it's a shortcut for not doing the harder but valid way of rebuilding trust.

Now, to limit the current flow of the thread to one topic, let's talk about their punishment and the repercussions of Morrie & Suzu's previous actions and how it'll carry into LCTWTO.

The legal issues are sticky, but they are minors and they could probably get out of JD as a punishment, especially if the law takes into account who their previous guardian was. Raymond Rydell must have forfeited his guardianship of the kids to Mrs. Mado. And now that Mrs. Mado will be in prison for the foreseeable future, I think Whit would have to technically become their foster parent and guardian if he wanted to take them in. I'm not completely sure on this, but I'm sure enough. We do not have to dwell on that in the episode, but it could at least be offhandedly mentioned.
User avatar
ASmouseInTheHouse
Caramel Crunch
Posts: 130
Joined: August 2019
Location: Some little corner of the world
Contact:

Post

Polehaus53 wrote:
Tue Oct 13, 2020 8:04 pm
I do have a suggestion: I can respond a lot faster if we were to discuss one issue at a time, rather than writing and tacking all of them in a gigantic post. It also may be easier for everyone else to keep track of it all, too.
I'm all for that. :D
Monica Stone wrote:
Tue Oct 13, 2020 8:55 pm
Now, to limit the current flow of the thread to one topic, let's talk about their punishment and the repercussions of Morrie & Suzu's previous actions and how it'll carry into LCTWTO.

The legal issues are sticky, but they are minors and they could probably get out of JD as a punishment, especially if the law takes into account who their previous guardian was. Raymond Rydell must have forfeited his guardianship of the kids to Mrs. Mado. And now that Mrs. Mado will be in prison for the foreseeable future, I think Whit would have to technically become their foster parent and guardian if he wanted to take them in. I'm not completely sure on this, but I'm sure enough. We do not have to dwell on that in the episode, but it could at least be offhandedly mentioned.
I agree. It's probably better if we don't get into the details.

Since we've agreed that Morrie and Suzu won't be serving punishment from the law, we can talk about what punishments they do face from Whit. I'll try to get specific. Please post opinions on my suggestions!
As many people have mentioned, they might be assigned to helping at Whit's End. Personally I don't think Whit would have them make ice cream or anything to do with serving food. Clearing tables and helping in the kitchen, maybe.
I had an odd thought that they could use their skills of mechanics/computers to troubleshoot or improve Whit's technology. I don't know if this is a good idea though.
But supposing we don't want to do that, they could be tasked with the boring things I mentioned, like cleaning or helping out the other employees in general. I don't think they would be working full-time. They'd probably have school to do first (unless Morrie (and Suzu) is still in the habit of finishing school quickly).

Well, those are some random suggestions for the Whit's End part of their punishment. Thoughts? :)
"Next up, Mark Morgan's message to all math maniacs in the middle school is meaningful if you mingle by the mezzanine for a momentous mix of methodological mayhem and a menagerie of multiplicative inversions. Ha ha ha! I bet I could say this backwards. Inversions multiplicative of menagerie a and mayhem methodological..."
User avatar
Polehaus53
Strawberry
Posts: 55
Joined: September 2020
Location: The Archives

Post

Monica Stone wrote:
Tue Oct 13, 2020 8:55 pm
Polehaus53 wrote:
Tue Oct 13, 2020 8:04 pm
Is it really necessary to continue the discussion between Whit and Morrie? This would mean we'd have to come to a conclusion on how Whit's actions are different from Morrie's.
I think it would be weird if we dropped that plot thread. I'm going to argue that Whit's actions are not much different than Morrie's in light of recent episodes. Whit may have a firmer foundation for why he does what he does, but that doesn't necessarily make what he does right. It doesn't have to be too heavy. Morrie can push back & Whit can provide answers to some of his questions. The questions that challenge Whit can be left open-ended and whatever conclusion Whit comes to can be vague and open for interpretation.
That makes sense. I'm fine if we include it. Just as long as we don't get too deep.
Monica Stone wrote:
Tue Oct 13, 2020 8:55 pm
Now, to limit the current flow of the thread to one topic, let's talk about their punishment and the repercussions of Morrie & Suzu's previous actions and how it'll carry into LCTWTO.
There would definitely be quite a few punishments for Morrie and Suzu's previous actions. (Perhaps we can compile a list of all their wrong actions?) I think it's safe to say that Whit is keeping them busy at Whit's End. I suppose they would also be in trouble at school, too? They were the ones who opened all the lockers and stole the stuff. And a brief mention of the legal issues would is fine.
"our language contains many words having a double meaning; and...to pronounce a joke that allows both meanings of a certain word, proves the joker a person of culture and refinement, who has, moreover, a thorough command of the language."
User avatar
MonkeyDude
Cookies & Creme
Posts: 380
Joined: January 2017
Location: Africa (do do do do do do do)

Post

Aaaahh I'm so out of the loop. This is all super great stuff! I'd love to get involved once my schedule settles down a bit.
*Finger guns aggressively*
User avatar
Monica Stone
Strawberry
Posts: 97
Joined: September 2020
Contact:

Post

MonkeyDude wrote:
Thu Oct 15, 2020 10:41 pm
Aaaahh I'm so out of the loop. This is all super great stuff! I'd love to get involved once my schedule settles down a bit.
We missed you! I understand your busyness; it's sometimes been challenging for me to find time to post online. If you have time to get involved, we welcome your input :D
ASmouseInTheHouse wrote:
Wed Oct 14, 2020 5:44 pm
As many people have mentioned, they might be assigned to helping at Whit's End. Personally I don't think Whit would have them make ice cream or anything to do with serving food. Clearing tables and helping in the kitchen, maybe.
I had an odd thought that they could use their skills of mechanics/computers to troubleshoot or improve Whit's technology. I don't know if this is a good idea though.
But supposing we don't want to do that, they could be tasked with the boring things I mentioned, like cleaning or helping out the other employees in general. I don't think they would be working full-time. They'd probably have school to do first (unless Morrie (and Suzu) is still in the habit of finishing school quickly).
I doubt Whit would let them mess around with his tech (if he did, I would riot because that would be an awful idea on his part, considering their past). They would undoubtedly be outstanding with his tech but that is exactly the problem. We don't need them somehow taking Applesauce out of the trash lol. Who knows, perhaps they could get involved with Whit's tech again, but I don't want Whit to be the one to just hand them that power. That would make Whit look worse than he does already. But then again, he did say he wanted to give them room to "use their abilities." Honestly, who knows with Whit anymore? If he wants to let them work on mechanics/computers, it should be under his watch. If Morrie & Suzu get into trouble on their own, that is their fault, but again, in this script, I don't want Whit to look like a doofus.

I agree that Whit would assign them chores like clearing tables, cleaning dishes, and maybe cleaning up odds & ends. They would have to finish their homework first (which I guarantee they would finish startlingly fast) and then Whit would assign chores around the shop. Kinda like being grounded but at Whit's End ahaha.
Polehaus53 wrote:
Thu Oct 15, 2020 5:17 pm
There would definitely be quite a few punishments for Morrie and Suzu's previous actions. (Perhaps we can compile a list of all their wrong actions?) I think it's safe to say that Whit is keeping them busy at Whit's End. I suppose they would also be in trouble at school, too? They were the ones who opened all the lockers and stole the stuff. And a brief mention of the legal issues would is fine.
They would not be punished for the write-in campaign and the writer's ruse. That would be dumb. Where they could face punishment is with the locker break-ins, the framing of Dion for all three nights, the Jordan Winword scheme, the escape room (!!!), and Emily's mind kidnapping (as I shall refer to it :p). I don't think Odyssey Middle would expell them (and anyway, plot-wise, that would be weird), but they probably would get detention for a couple weeks or something. Suzu only stole things the first night, but Morrie returned the items if I'm remembering correctly. Then, Morrie examined people's possessions for "secrets" (aka Emily's password, something to blackmail Dion with, and likely more stuff). Technically no stealing, as the items were returned.
User avatar
ASmouseInTheHouse
Caramel Crunch
Posts: 130
Joined: August 2019
Location: Some little corner of the world
Contact:

Post

Monica Stone wrote:
Fri Oct 16, 2020 9:24 pm
I doubt Whit would let them mess around with his tech (if he did, I would riot because that would be an awful idea on his part, considering their past). They would undoubtedly be outstanding with his tech but that is exactly the problem. We don't need them somehow taking Applesauce out of the trash lol. Who knows, perhaps they could get involved with Whit's tech again, but I don't want Whit to be the one to just hand them that power. That would make Whit look worse than he does already. But then again, he did say he wanted to give them room to "use their abilities." Honestly, who knows with Whit anymore? If he wants to let them work on mechanics/computers, it should be under his watch. If Morrie & Suzu get into trouble on their own, that is their fault, but again, in this script, I don't want Whit to look like a doofus.
I agree. And as you said, who knows Whit anymore? It's probably not even necessary for Morrie and Suzu to mess with tech in the episode, so we don't have to do that.
Monica Stone wrote:
Fri Oct 16, 2020 9:24 pm
They would not be punished for the write-in campaign and the writer's ruse. That would be dumb. Where they could face punishment is with the locker break-ins, the framing of Dion for all three nights, the Jordan Winword scheme, the escape room (!!!), and Emily's mind kidnapping (as I shall refer to it :p). I don't think Odyssey Middle would expell them (and anyway, plot-wise, that would be weird), but they probably would get detention for a couple weeks or something. Suzu only stole things the first night, but Morrie returned the items if I'm remembering correctly. Then, Morrie examined people's possessions for "secrets" (aka Emily's password, something to blackmail Dion with, and likely more stuff). Technically no stealing, as the items were returned.
To clarify: So, they would still get in trouble with the school for opening the lockers, but not for stealing since nothing was stolen, right? And as punishment both are sentenced to detention? (Emily would be able to avoid them pretty well after school if that was the case.)

Is that all that needs to be figured out for their punishment? Any other ideas or suggestions?
"Next up, Mark Morgan's message to all math maniacs in the middle school is meaningful if you mingle by the mezzanine for a momentous mix of methodological mayhem and a menagerie of multiplicative inversions. Ha ha ha! I bet I could say this backwards. Inversions multiplicative of menagerie a and mayhem methodological..."
User avatar
Polehaus53
Strawberry
Posts: 55
Joined: September 2020
Location: The Archives

Post

Monica Stone wrote:
Fri Oct 16, 2020 9:24 pm
I agree that Whit would assign them chores like clearing tables, cleaning dishes, and maybe cleaning up odds & ends. They would have to finish their homework first (which I guarantee they would finish startlingly fast) and then Whit would assign chores around the shop. Kinda like being grounded but at Whit's End ahaha.
I like this idea. Morrie and Suzu would most certainly finish their homework fast, so Whit can keep them busy doing things at Whit's End (mopping floors, cleaning tables, washing dishes, etc.).
Monica Stone wrote:
Fri Oct 16, 2020 9:24 pm
They would not be punished for the write-in campaign and the writer's ruse. That would be dumb. Where they could face punishment is with the locker break-ins, the framing of Dion for all three nights, the Jordan Winword scheme, the escape room (!!!), and Emily's mind kidnapping (as I shall refer to it :p). I don't think Odyssey Middle would expell them (and anyway, plot-wise, that would be weird), but they probably would get detention for a couple weeks or something. Suzu only stole things the first night, but Morrie returned the items if I'm remembering correctly. Then, Morrie examined people's possessions for "secrets" (aka Emily's password, something to blackmail Dion with, and likely more stuff). Technically no stealing, as the items were returned.
Of course, not for the writer's ruse and the election. I meant the locker incident, escape room, and the 'mind kidnapping'. I don't think the school would punish them for the Jordan Winword scheme. While the locker incident and Dion's framing took place at the school, Jordan Winword's involvement with Olivia's promise to the drama club didn't directly involve the school. He just called Olivia and Olivia agreed to his "promise" that he didn't keep. I think Whit would be the one punishing them for that incident. The escape room incident would involve legal stuff, and we said we should just make a brief mention of the legal issues.

What have we all agreed on so far? Morrie and Suzu are being put to work at Whit's End as punishment. Is that it?
ASmouseInTheHouse wrote: And as punishment both are sentenced to detention? (Emily would be able to avoid them pretty well after school if that was the case.)
Agreed. I suggest we show some scenes with Emily trying to avoid them.
"our language contains many words having a double meaning; and...to pronounce a joke that allows both meanings of a certain word, proves the joker a person of culture and refinement, who has, moreover, a thorough command of the language."
User avatar
Monica Stone
Strawberry
Posts: 97
Joined: September 2020
Contact:

Post

Good thoughts. Sorry, I haven't responded; I've been busy.

What are we trying to accomplish by putting Emily in the episode? There's a lot of baggage there. What's her role? Where does she start and where does she finish by the end of the episode?
User avatar
ASmouseInTheHouse
Caramel Crunch
Posts: 130
Joined: August 2019
Location: Some little corner of the world
Contact:

Post

Monica Stone wrote:
Sun Oct 25, 2020 7:48 pm
What are we trying to accomplish by putting Emily in the episode? There's a lot of baggage there. What's her role? Where does she start and where does she finish by the end of the episode?
We've all agreed that Emily would be very cold/avoiding the Rydell kids. So, I guess the question is, should their entire conflict be resolved at the end of the episode? Personally, I would be surprised if that happened, and I say no. I'm thinking maybe Emily becomes a little less cold to them by the end. She would definitely not be completely comfortable with them, but it might be a start. How the Rydells get to that point, I'm not sure.
Thoughts?
"Next up, Mark Morgan's message to all math maniacs in the middle school is meaningful if you mingle by the mezzanine for a momentous mix of methodological mayhem and a menagerie of multiplicative inversions. Ha ha ha! I bet I could say this backwards. Inversions multiplicative of menagerie a and mayhem methodological..."
User avatar
Polehaus53
Strawberry
Posts: 55
Joined: September 2020
Location: The Archives

Post

By putting Emily in the episode, we continue to show her relationship with the Rydell kids and Whit. The last we heard in "The Rydell Revelations, Part 3", she says, "I don't know." in response to their question of if they can be friends. That did not sound positive. Of course, as we have all agreed, Emily probably has some cold feelings towards Whit, as well. Both these points should be addressed. In the episode, she can start by avoiding Whit and the Rydell kids. By the end of the episode she should, as we've said, not have entirely forgiven them, but at least be a little less cold towards them.

Anything else we can discuss?
"our language contains many words having a double meaning; and...to pronounce a joke that allows both meanings of a certain word, proves the joker a person of culture and refinement, who has, moreover, a thorough command of the language."
Post Reply